How to Get 99+ Endorsements on All Your LinkedIn Skills

How to Get 99+ Endorsements on All Your LinkedIn Skills
“I got 99+ endorsements, and they all help prove my proficiency in key areas.” That’s what Jay Z might say if he was optimizing his LinkedIn profile. Hopefully you get the reference. But seriously, LinkedIn endorsements are really important. In fact, they’re one of the most effective ways to prove your expertise and back up your claims. Anyone can say they possess a particular skill, but having 99+ endorsements proves that. What are endorsements? Before…

“I got 99+ endorsements, and they all help prove my proficiency in key areas.”

That’s what Jay Z might say if he was optimizing his LinkedIn profile.

Hopefully you get the reference.

But seriously, LinkedIn endorsements are really important.

In fact, they’re one of the most effective ways to prove your expertise and back up your claims.

Anyone can say they possess a particular skill, but having 99+ endorsements proves that.

What are endorsements?

Before I go any further, allow me to explain this concept if you’re unfamiliar.

It’s pretty simple.

Endorsements are a LinkedIn feature that allows others to verify your skills with a single click.

Here’s a screenshot of the formal definition given by LinkedIn:

For instance, the top three skills I list on my profile are SEO, online marketing, and web analytics.

Endorsements are a simple way to prove you are not a charlatan—you’re genuinely proficient at the skills you list on your profile.

The more endorsements you have, the more legit you appear.

Ideally, you’ll want to reach 99+.

Not to toot my own horn, but that’s what I’ve achieved on the vast majority of my LinkedIn skills.

See?

Here too:

All are 99+.

Of course, you can have thousands of endorsements for a certain skill, but 99+ is the highest number that will appear unless someone actually clicks on the skill to dig deeper.

Here’s what I’m talking about:

I actually have 2,134 endorsements for SEO, but 99+ is what visitors first see.

Why are endorsements important?

Getting people to endorse you can open doors and unlock opportunities that might not have happened otherwise.

It’s a way to validate yourself and show you really do “have the chops.”

This is obviously appealing to those who come across your LinkedIn profile, looking to find a partner in a business project, working arrangement, and so on.

Some experts even suspect it can impact your search ranking.

The bottom line is the more endorsements you receive, the better.

In this article, I’d like to discuss some strategies to help you get 99+ endorsements on all your LinkedIn skills.

Let’s start from the top.

Prioritize your skills

Most people have a wide array of skills.

And LinkedIn is more than happy to help you share them with the world.

In fact, they allow you to list up to 50.

I list a few dozen on my profile.

But you need to be selective about the skills you list at the top.

Like I mentioned earlier, the top three skills I list are SEO, online marketing, and web analytics.

This is important for two reasons.

First, it tends to be easier to get endorsements when it’s for your core skills that people naturally associate you with.

For example, I do have experience with website development. That’s true.

But I’m far more skilled at SEO.

Therefore, most people associate my name with SEO more than website development, which makes them far more likely to give me an endorsement for SEO.

That’s why I made the conscious decision to use SEO as the first skill on my profile.

Second, people tend to get overwhelmed if there is a ridiculous number of choices.

But if you place your primary skills at the top, people can zone in on those skills, which increases the likelihood of them giving you an endorsement.

Endorse others

I’m a firm believer in the law of reciprocity.

It’s a psychological principle I’ve discussed in several blog posts mainly in the context of conversion optimization.

Long story short, it simply means that people are inclined to do something nice for you if you do something nice for them.

But reciprocity can be applied to LinkedIn endorsements as well.

And it’s not rocket science.

Endorse the skills of others, and there’s a good chance a considerable percentage of them will return the favor.

I recommend starting with the people you’re closest to and have the tightest relationships with.

This might include colleagues, team members, previous employers, and satisfied customers/clients.

Look over the skills they list on their profiles, and add a few endorsements.

Once they see you’ve made the effort to help them, many will be inclined to help you as well.

If they know for a fact you’re adept at a particular skill, it shouldn’t be any trouble for them to endorse you.

And the beautiful thing is it’s easy to do.

It’s not like it requires a major time commitment.

Unlike personal recommendations that require someone to write a unique statement, an endorsement requires only a single click.

It’s really no big deal.

Straight up ask for endorsements

One thing I’ve learned in life, as well as in business, is that it’s important to ask.

Some of my biggest breakthroughs were simply the result of me asking for help, a favor, etc.

And you know what?

A lot of people are more than willing to help you out.

Tactic #1

If you’re looking to raise your number of endorsements quickly, I suggest politely asking others to give them to you.

An article on Portfolium discusses a specific formula for increasing endorsements by asking.

It’s simple.

The author, Scott, created a brief message that he sent to 300 connections asking for endorsements.

Here’s what it looked like:

I’d like to point out his opening line:

What skills do you want to be endorsed for?

I think this is a more effective way to approach people than immediately asking for an endorsement—it doesn’t make you come across as overly self-serving.

After sending this message to 300 connections, Scott saw a drastic increase in his number of endorsements.

It went from a meager 28 to 302, which was an increase of over 1,000%!

The amazing thing is that it took less than 15 minutes.

Tweak this template as you see fit, and send it to as many connections as possible.

While you may not get quite the level of results that Scott did, I can pretty much guarantee you’ll see a substantial spike in your number of endorsements.

Tactic #2

Here’s another simple way to go about asking.

It involves leveraging existing resources where people understand your skillset and know what you bring to the table.

Some examples might include your blog and email.

Here’s what you do.

First, invite others to connect with you on LinkedIn.

This is necessary because the last time I checked, only first-degree connections are allowed to endorse you.

To do this you, you could leave a CTA with a link to your LinkedIn account at the end of blog posts or in your email signature.

Then, each time you make a new connection, send them the message I discussed in the previous tactic.

Be active on LinkedIn

One of the things I find interesting about LinkedIn is that many people seldom update their profiles.

While there are 467 million users, only 3 million update their profiles on a weekly basis.

That’s a tiny percentage.

Most people update their Facebook at least two or three times a week.

It’s usually the same with Instagram profiles.

As for Twitter, it’s not uncommon to hit double-digit updates daily.

But for some reason, most people totally forget about LinkedIn.

But that’s not how I roll.

If you look at the activity feed of my profile, you’ll notice I update quite frequently:

And for a good reason.

The more often I update, the more I’m on the radar of my connections.

This means more traffic to my profile and more opportunities for engagement, including endorsements.

What I’m trying to say is that you should make a point to consistently update your LinkedIn profile with quality content.

It doesn’t even need to be your own content.

Curated content is totally fine as long as it offers real value and scratches your connections’ collective itch.

And when you’re choosing what type of content to post, try to make sure it’s relevant to the primary skills you’re seeking endorsements for.

If conversion optimization is your thing, you might want to post something from ConversionXL.

Considering the small number of people posting updates on LinkedIn, it should be fairly easy for you to gain users’ attention when they scroll through their feeds.

Conclusion

When it comes to professional networking, LinkedIn is the go-to network.

While it doesn’t get as much attention or have the same user base as Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter, you don’t want to overlook it.

In fact, it’s been an incredibly powerful tool for me and has helped me make several valuable connections over the years.

One of the ways you can prove you’re legitimately proficient at the skills you list is by having others vouch for you by giving endorsements.

It’s quick and easy but can have a tremendous impact on your personal brand, especially if you’re able to gain 99+ endorsements.

By using these strategies, you can effectively leverage your network to get the endorsements you’re looking for.

And who knows what opportunities this will lead to in the future…

The long-term implications can be profound.

How do you typically go about getting endorsements for your LinkedIn skills?


Source: quicksprout

How to Get 99+ Endorsements on All Your LinkedIn Skills

The Ultimate Blueprint for Creating a Super Persuasive Testimonial

The Ultimate Blueprint for Creating a Super Persuasive Testimonial
It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to understand the correlation between testimonials and higher conversions. As humans, we’re wired to seek feedback from others. But testimonials may carry even more weight than you may have thought. Research found that customer testimonials are considered to be one of the most effective content marketing techniques, identified by 89% of B2B marketers. And there’s one particular A/B test involving testimonials I really like. It compared different variations of a landing…

It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to understand the correlation between testimonials and higher conversions.

As humans, we’re wired to seek feedback from others.

But testimonials may carry even more weight than you may have thought.

Research found that

customer testimonials are considered to be one of the most effective content marketing techniques, identified by 89% of B2B marketers.

And there’s one particular A/B test involving testimonials I really like.

It compared different variations of a landing page for Seiko Watches.

Here’s the first version, containing no testimonials:

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And here’s the second version, containing a widget featuring positive customer reviews:

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Guess by how much the conversions improved.

By 58.39%!

Not too shabby.

But I have a bone to pick with the way most brands approach testimonials.

I feel the majority stick to a conventional format and aren’t fully harnessing the true power of testimonials.

In this post, I break down what I think the ultimate blueprint for creating a super persuasive testimonial is.

I’ll briefly touch on the fundamentals and throw in some other angles you might not have thought of.

Here we go.

Use images

I won’t bore you with a long-winded explanation of the importance of images.

This is usually one of the first bits of advice you’ll hear.

But they really are a critical element of a strong testimonial.

In fact,

65% of senior marketing executives believe that visual assets are core to how their brand story is communicated.

image5

Not only do images make testimonials look more professional, they increase “truthiness,” defined as a subjective feeling of truth.

This is what you’re looking for when attempting to create a connection and persuade leads to buy.

Include specifics

You probably know I’m a stat guy.

I love stats!

For me, data is the perfect way to help prospects connect the dots and understand why your brand is worth doing business with.

I can’t stress enough how important it is to include concrete numbers in your testimonials.

Don’t just feature testimonials that say your product “is good.”

Give prospects real data.

Here are a couple of examples of testimonials I use on NeilPatel.com.

There’s one reason I use these specific testimonials.

They work.

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Seeing that Timothy earned $15 million in revenue and received 26% more traffic is much better than saying something like, “Neil really helped my company and you should work with him.”

It’s the same story here with Gawker Media:

image9

Here’s how Freshbooks uses this technique:

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The point here is to make it crystal clear what results your prospects can expect.

Show them how you can help them in a tangible way.

And here’s another quick tip.

Try to stay away from round numbers, like 20% and 30%.

Consumers tend to prefer exactness, and using only perfect numbers may raise suspicion.

Show the good and bad

If there’s one mistake I see brands making time and time again, it’s using only rosy testimonials.

Don’t get me wrong: you obviously want to sell yourself and ensure that prospects view you in a positive light.

But you don’t want to go overboard and feature testimonials that offer nothing but praise without any negatives whatsoever.

This can kill your credibility, and it tends to make visitors more skeptical.

After all, any charlatan can slap up some bogus reviews and make themselves look like a saint.

What people are looking for is authenticity.

They want to see your brand for what it really is, flaws and all.

In fact, studies suggest that bad reviews can actually be good for business.

Research from social commerce company Reevoo found that

68% consumers trust reviews more when they see both good and bad scores, while 30% suspect censorship or faked reviews when they don’t see anything negative at all.

Just think about it.

Have you ever done research on a product and seen nothing but rave reviews, with every single testimonial giving it 10 out of 10?

To me, that’s a red flag. I feel something is definitely up.

This isn’t to say you should include testimonials that bash your company.

That would be foolish.

But showing a flaw or two can actually work to your advantage.

Make testimonials traceable

Anyone can say a testimonial was written by “Jack W. from Orlando.”

But how do your prospects know it’s legit?

They don’t.

I’ve realized one of the best ways to quell skepticism is to make your testimonials “traceable.”

By this I mean including a link to the person’s website, portfolio, Twitter page, etc.

It doesn’t really matter as long as you can prove that the person giving the review actually exists and that the testimonial isn’t fabricated.

And here’s another idea.

Create an entire page that thoroughly explains how your product/service helped the person and contributed to their success.

Here’s a nice example from Kissmetrics:

image2

By clicking on the link, prospects are taken to this page where they can learn more about the company (Mention) and how Kissmetrics helped it improve its performance.

They’ll instantly know the testimonial is genuine, and it can provide even more incentive to purchase.

I took full advantage of this tactic on NeilPatel.com, where I feature a case study of Timothy Sykes.

Here are a couple of screenshots:

image14

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I’ve found this to be a tremendous help, and it’s helped me reel in several big name clients.

Target heavy hitters

I’m going to preface this by saying this isn’t applicable to every brand.

If you’re coming from relative obscurity, it may not be feasible to get testimonials from big name celebrities and industry experts.

But if you can land even one “heavy hitter,” the rewards should be plentiful.

Here’s a good example from Help Scout:

image3

It’s safe to say Gary Vaynerchuk is a pretty big deal.

Here’s another one, featuring Seth Godin:

image12

Just imagine the impact of having someone prominent giving your brand a nod of approval.

It could make all the difference.

Check out this resource for some pointers on landing this type of testimonial.

Experiment with a long-form format

If you listen to standard advice on testimonials, you’ll probably hear that you should keep them short and sweet.

However, this isn’t always the best route to go.

In fact, longer testimonials are often more persuasive than standard, short ones.

Why?

Think about it.

Long-form testimonials allow you to explain the ins and outs of your product and provide specific examples of how it has helped your customers.

You can effectively cover multiple aspects of your product and address any concerns your prospects may have.

One of the best examples I’ve seen of long-form testimonials is Noah Kagan’s landing page for Make Your First Dollar course.

Here’s what I’m talking about:

image11

It’s incredibly in-depth, and I’m sure many of the people reading this testimonial could put themselves in Bryan’s shoes.

Now, I’m not saying long-form is the right approach for every single brand, but it’s definitely something to consider.

If you zig when your competitors zag, this could be your ticket to making your brand stand out.

Experiment with video

Who says a testimonial has to be a conventional text-based snippet?

There are no rules.

I’m a fan of experimenting with different mediums, especially video.

And quite frankly, video has never been hotter than it is right now.

Here are just a few interesting video marketing stats:

  • “45% of people watch more than an hour of Facebook or YouTube videos a week.”
  • “85% of the US Internet audience watches videos online.”
  • “51% of marketing professionals worldwide name video as the type of content with the best ROI.”
  • “Marketers who use video grow revenue 49% faster than non-video users.”

If you’re crushing it with video in other areas of marketing, why not incorporate it into your testimonials?

One company in particular that pulls this off flawlessly is Codecademy:

image7

They provide a great real-life example of how one of their users elevated his career and created one of the top 50 websites in 2013.

It’s very compelling, and I’m sure it’s motivated many “iffy” prospects to go ahead and sign up for Codecademy.

Unbounce did A/B testing on their homepage to see what impact video testimonials would have.

Here’s page A, featuring traditional text testimonials:

image15

It looks good enough.

But here’s page B, featuring a video:

image10

This led to a 25% conversion lift!

If you’re looking for inspiration and ideas for creating video testimonials, check out this post from HubSpot.

There’s a bunch of great examples.

Conclusion

At its core, a testimonial is a very simple thing.

It’s

a formal statement testifying to someone’s or a brand’s character and qualifications.

But the way you go about creating a testimonial and the elements you incorporate can make or break it.

The more tried-and-true tactics are okay, and I’m sure they will have some impact.

But the tactics I explained in this post should maximize that impact.

Following this blueprint should enable you to create a highly persuasive testimonial your prospects will eat up.

This should make it possible to quickly gain their trust, squash any skepticism they may have, and ultimately motivate them to buy.

What do you think the most important element of a testimonial is?


Source: quicksprout

The Ultimate Blueprint for Creating a Super Persuasive Testimonial

578: 4 Behaviors of Top-Performing CEOs

578: 4 Behaviors of Top-Performing CEOs
Elena Botelho, partner at leadership advisory firm ghSmart, talks about the disconnect between the stereotype of the CEO and what research shows actually leads to high performance at that level. She says the image of the charismatic, tall male with a top university degree who’s a strategic visionary and makes great decisions under pressure is a pervasive one. However, research shows that four behaviors more consistently lead to high performance in the corner office: 1)…
Elena Botelho, partner at leadership advisory firm ghSmart, talks about the disconnect between the stereotype of the CEO and what research shows actually leads to high performance at that level. She says the image of the charismatic, tall male with a top university degree who’s a strategic visionary and makes great decisions under pressure is a pervasive one. However, research shows that four behaviors more consistently lead to high performance in the corner office: 1) deciding with speed and conviction 2) engaging for impact 3) adapting proactively 4) delivering reliably. Botelho is the co-author of the article “What Sets Successful CEOs Apart” in the May-June 2017 issue of Harvard Business Review.
Source: Ideacast

578: 4 Behaviors of Top-Performing CEOs

How the public sector can remain agile beyond times of crisis

How the public sector can remain agile beyond times of crisis
Public-sector organizations have shown they can be nimble in a crisis. Focusing on agility could help them keep pace with changing needs during challenges—and beyond.
Public-sector organizations have shown they can be nimble in a crisis. Focusing on agility could help them keep pace with changing needs during challenges—and beyond.
Source: McKinsey

How the public sector can remain agile beyond times of crisis

10 Lessons Digital Marketers Can Learn from HBO’s Silicon Valley

10 Lessons Digital Marketers Can Learn from HBO’s Silicon Valley
Do you like to binge-watch a TV series? I don’t do it often. Hardly ever, in fact. But yep, I’ve done it before. For me, it’s one of life’s simple pleasures. Every once in awhile, I’ll find a series totally “binge-worthy.” It can make you a little crazy, especially if you spend the better part of the night glued to the TV. But it’s pretty friggin’ enjoyable. One series in particular that’s binge-worthy is HBO’s…

Do you like to binge-watch a TV series?

I don’t do it often. Hardly ever, in fact. But yep, I’ve done it before. For me, it’s one of life’s simple pleasures.

Every once in awhile, I’ll find a series totally “binge-worthy.”

It can make you a little crazy, especially if you spend the better part of the night glued to the TV.

image4

But it’s pretty friggin’ enjoyable.

One series in particular that’s binge-worthy is HBO’s Silicon Valley.

If you’re unfamiliar, it’s about a team of young IT entrepreneurs who launch a startup called Pied Piper.

image12

The show chronicles their successes and failures along the way.

It’s super funny and perfect if you’re at all entrepreneurially inclined or just like to geek out on tech.

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But I also think there are some golden lessons digital marketers can take away from the show.

After all, even though it’s a comedy series with some wacked out episodes, it does have a lot of truth in it.

I’ve spent a lot of time in Silicon Valley, so I can relate to what’s going on in the show.

The show is legit.

Whether you’ve been at it for years or are new to the game, you can learn something that’s practical, even from a comedy like this one.

Here are 10 lessons to be had from HBO’s Silicon Valley.

1. Being flexible is a huge asset

You’ve probably heard the statistic that eight out of 10 businesses fail within 18 months.

While this stat is debatable (The US Bureau of Labor Statistics reports 50% of all new businesses make it to their fifth year and one third make it to their tenth year), many businesses do in fact fail.

But if you’re flexible and nimble, you can switch up your game plan to account for change and unexpected curveballs along the way.

In the show, the team’s initial idea was to create a music app for songwriters to ensure they weren’t infringing on any copyrights.

But after getting feedback, they quickly realized this idea wasn’t going to fly.

What did they do?

They took a completely different approach and developed a “compression cloud” solution, widening their demographic significantly.

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Just like in the show, adaptability in business is incredibly important in real life.

It’s not always who’s the smartest or who has the most financial backing.

Sometimes, success comes to those who are most able to adapt to change, making the necessary adjustments.

If it’s clear a particular digital marketing technique isn’t working, you may need to change your direction to get the results you’re looking for.

2. Don’t burn bridges or make enemies

Erlich Bachman is a funny guy.

But he’s also quite crude at times.

image11

He has a bad habit of pissing off venture capital firms and thus missing out on valuable funding opportunities.

As a business owner or a marketer, you definitely don’t want to do that.

Relationships are huge.

In many cases, your relationships (or lack thereof) can make or break you.

Don’t take them for granted.

Always make an effort to remain professional even if you don’t always see eye to eye with everyone.

Even if your colleagues’ ideas completely suck, don’t bash them for it.

Instead, conduct yourself with tact.

3. Don’t overlook legalities

We live in an extremely litigation-happy world.

You see it in Silicon Valley—the show and the real thing.

Thankfully, there’s this guy:

image7

He’s very uncool, but he knows how to keep the startup from getting screwed over by lawyers.

And it’s a good thing because “there are over 100 million cases filed in US state courts every year.”

Law is a recurring theme in Silicon Valley, especially as it pertains to intellectual property.

When it comes to digital marketing, you’ll want to have some basic knowledge of branding and trademark law to ensure you’re not overstepping your boundaries or infringing on anyone’s brand identity.

Check out this resource from Branding Strategy Insider for more details on this.

4. Be careful of shameless publicity

There’s an old saying that “any publicity is good publicity.”

But this isn’t always the case.

At one point, Erlich tries to shamelessly generate publicity for himself and Pied Piper.

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In the process, he blows through massive wads of cash, nearly ruining the company.

The point is be careful about how your brand is depicted and with whom you choose to align your brand.

And let’s be honest.

It’s not all that difficult to tarnish your brand’s reputation.

Between review sites and social media, a few unsavory comments can quickly bring the walls crumbling down.

Although you can’t totally control how the public perceives your brand, try to stay away from stupid publicity stunts that may do more harm than good.

5. Building a brand is a process

If I’ve learned anything during my time as an entrepreneur, it’s that patience is a huge benefit.

We live in a microwave culture, where instant gratification has become the norm.

And many marketers get frustrated and disillusioned when they don’t see overnight success.

But it doesn’t work like that with branding.

It takes time. Sometimes, it takes several years for any noticeable results to emerge.

In Silicon Valley, the team goes through a lot of twists and turns before Pied Piper becomes a household name.

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So, a big part of making it is simply staying the course.

You need to have the mental fortitude to keep moving along and take it step by step.

But the thing I love about branding is the snowball effect, when a brand keeps getting bigger and bigger with time.

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While your brand equity may be next to nothing initially, it keeps growing to the point of explosion.

Understanding that branding is a process that takes time should help sustain you when things seem bleak and you’re tempted to give up.

6. Embrace mistakes (but learn from them)

I absolutely love this quote from Nobel Prize winner Frank Wilczek:

If you don’t make mistakes, you’re not working on hard enough problems. And that’s a big mistake.

This simply means that mistakes are an inevitable part of making progress.

I’ve learned not to beat myself up too badly if I botch something or even flat out make a stupid mistake.

I just chalk it up to progress.

In Silicon Valley, people make mistakes all the time, but they always work to get past them.

In digital marketing, you’re likely to make plenty of mistakes along the way.

I know I did (and still do).

But as long as you’re genuinely learning from your mistakes and utilizing that knowledge to improve, you should be good to go.

7. Strive for a healthy work/life balance

Working hard and having a strong work ethic is good and all.

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But it shouldn’t come at the cost of your own personal well-being.

I know this all too well because I have workaholic tendencies.

In the show, Richard explains to his doctor that he’s been having night sweats induced by stress.

The doctor explains that this can be a precursor to bed-wetting, which is never a good thing.

It’s quite embarrassing.

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Try not to allow yourself to get overwhelmed with your marketing activities.

Strive to find a healthy work/life balance, and recharge your batteries from time to time.

This will make you more effective in your marketing, and you won’t have to worry about being an adult who wets the bed.

8. Keep your eyes on the prize

It’s easy to get distracted in business and marketing.

There are always new techniques and tactics that can distract you from what you’re good at and what’s really working.

For instance, at some point in the show, the team is forced to work on a non-core product, which ended up being a major distraction.

In turn, this created a road block on their path to success.

I’m not saying you shouldn’t experiment, but it’s important to focus on your strengths and not lose sight of the ultimate goal.

9. Quality is key

At one point, Gavin Belson, CEO of a competing company, presents company’s new product Nucleus, which ends up being a complete disaster.

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This serves as a reminder that quality should always be of the utmost importance.

You want to put in enough time and energy to ensure your audience is getting the best possible experience.

Whether it’s creating blog content or running your social media campaign, it’s better to focus on quality over quantity.

Taking shortcuts is never the way to go.

10. Make the right hires

If you’re assembling a marketing team, you need to go about it the right way.

Don’t carelessly choose someone without ensuring they’ve got the chops and will mesh with your culture.

A bad hire can kill your vibe and stall your progress.

In the long run, this can also put a damper on morale and be disruptive to team chemistry.

For tips on hiring and creating an awesome team, I suggest reading this article from Wired.

Conclusion

Although Silicon Valley is a comedy, there are many lessons that can be applied to digital marketing and business in general.

In fact, I feel a lot of wisdom can be extracted from this show.

Whether it’s learning to adapt in an ever-changing marketing world, learning from your mistakes, or simply refraining from being a douchebag, the lessons from Silicon Valley can make you a better digital marketer in many ways.

Can you think of any other business- or marketing-related takeaways from the show?


Source: quicksprout

10 Lessons Digital Marketers Can Learn from HBO’s Silicon Valley

How good is your company’s internal customer experience?

How good is your company’s internal customer experience?
To excel with customers, frontline employees need high-level service from core support functions. Société Générale’s group head of corporate resources and innovation explains how to achieve such symmetry.
To excel with customers, frontline employees need high-level service from core support functions. Société Générale’s group head of corporate resources and innovation explains how to achieve such symmetry.
Source: McKinsey

How good is your company’s internal customer experience?

Product managers for the digital world

Product managers for the digital world
The role of the product manager is expanding due to the growing importance of data in decision making, an increased customer and design focus, and the evolution of software-development methodologies.
The role of the product manager is expanding due to the growing importance of data in decision making, an increased customer and design focus, and the evolution of software-development methodologies.
Source: McKinsey

Product managers for the digital world

Sapwood Cellars: Maryland Brewery in Planning!

Sapwood Cellars: Maryland Brewery in Planning!
I’m founding Sapwood Cellars, a brewery in Maryland, with my friend and fellow homebrewer Scott Janish! We’ll produce a spectrum of barrel-aged bottle-conditioned mixed-fermentation beers along with fresh hoppy ales for onsite consumption. I’ll post occasional updates to The Mad Fermentationist along with the usually scheduled homebrewing content. However, if you don’t want to miss a single development, sign-up for the email list at Sapwood Cellars or follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.Expect a wide range of…
I’m founding Sapwood Cellars, a brewery in Maryland, with my friend and fellow homebrewer Scott Janish! We’ll produce a spectrum of barrel-aged bottle-conditioned mixed-fermentation beers along with fresh hoppy ales for onsite consumption. I’ll post occasional updates to The Mad Fermentationist along with the usually scheduled homebrewing content. However, if you don’t want to miss a single development, sign-up for the email list at Sapwood Cellars or follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Expect a wide range of beers, especially releases that evolve from batch-to-batch with a focus on experimentation, local ingredients, and education. We’ll be almost as open about the Sapwood Cellars beers as we are about our homebrews. You’ll get to read about both our thought and brewing processes as always, with the added fun of tasting the results!

I never had a long-term plan for brewing because it was a hobby. I liked drinking beer, so I took a homebrewing class my senior year at Carnegie Mellon. I enjoyed brewing, so I started a blog. I had fun blogging, so I wrote a book. I’ve had a couple offers to brew professionally over the years, but none of them were tempting enough for me quit my day job. Founding a brewery comes with extra headaches and risks beyond brewing, but ownership will allow me to brew with fewer compromises. At first we’ll be more like professional homebrewers, rather than the next large regional craft brewery, but we’ll follow the brewery where it takes us!

Partnering with Scott makes the numerous tasks and significant risks manageable. When we first met I was impressed by his IPAs, and we bonded over hop oil calculators. His deep-dives into mouthfeel, hop chemistry, and a variety of other topics on his eponymous blog continue to impress. I got lucky and he’d been quietly considering opening a brewery on his own right before I floated the idea of teaming up last summer.

In February, while I was recording The Sour Hour, I mentioned the brewery because I assumed we’d have a logo and polished website by the time the episodes aired in late-April… our placeholder splash page is up, a logo is in the works, and it’s only late-May. Given the uncertainty of our timeline, I’m not going to guess at when we’ll be brewing or serving beer but we’re charging ahead on all fronts!

Head over to Scott’s blog to read his side of the story!

Drinking NEIPA at NHC Baltimore.

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Sapwood Cellars

Our Story
Sapwood Cellars is a Maryland brewery-in-planning dually focused on barrel-aged mixed-fermented beers and fresh hoppy ales. Founded by two passionate homebrewing ultra-nerds, we share a love of brewing science, local ingredients, and the craft of beer production. You may have read our blogs, magazine articles, or book on American sour beers, but likely haven’t tasted our beer. Follow along as we continue to brew peculiar beers, with the added enjoyment of drinking the results!

Expect beers that are balanced, drinkable, and highly aromatic without tongue-scraping bitterness from hops or piercing sourness from mixed-fermentation. Beer should be a pleasure to savor, not a challenge to conquer.

Sign-up for email updates to keep tabs on our progress, learn about opportunities to help, and be the first to know when beer is available!

Our Name
All wood first starts as Sapwood, which is the delicate new growth just under the bark. It plays an integral part of a tree’s maturation by carrying water between the leaves and roots, carefully distributing built-up reserves to the roots and leaves as the seasons demand. Eventually, Sapwood hardens into the heartwood of which barrels are made. Sapwood ties together the two sides of our production: Sap for the fresh IPAs and Wood for the acidic barrel-aged beers. Cellar is the brewer’s term for the fermentation space but also evokes the cool quiet resting place of barrels.

Who We Are
Mike Tonsmeire – mike@sapwoodcellars.com

A homebrewer since 2005, Michael writes The Mad Fermentationist blog and the Advanced Brewing columnist for Brew Your Own Magazine. His book, American Sour Beers (Brewer’s Publications, 2014) is a resource for homebrewers and craft brewers alike. He worked as a consultant for Modern Times and a dozen other craft breweries.

Scott Janish – scott@sapwoodcellars.com

A homebrewer since 2012, Scott writes for his own hop-focused blog, ScottJanish.com, with a focus on academic research and applying the latest science to brewing.


Source: The Mad Fermentationist

Sapwood Cellars: Maryland Brewery in Planning!

Prosperity postponed

Prosperity postponed
Some stability returned to the OFSE sector in Q1 2017, with strong US onshore performance offsetting moderate decline elsewhere. However, prosperity has not yet arrived as oil prices went sideways.
Some stability returned to the OFSE sector in Q1 2017, with strong US onshore performance offsetting moderate decline elsewhere. However, prosperity has not yet arrived as oil prices went sideways.
Source: McKinsey

Prosperity postponed