574: Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant on Resilience

574: Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant on Resilience
Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg talks about returning to work after her husband’s death, and Wharton management and psychology professor Adam Grant discusses what the research says about resilience. In this joint interview, they talk about how to build resilience in yourself, your team, and your organization. They’re the authors of the new book, “Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience, and Finding Joy.”
Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg talks about returning to work after her husband’s death, and Wharton management and psychology professor Adam Grant discusses what the research says about resilience. In this joint interview, they talk about how to build resilience in yourself, your team, and your organization. They’re the authors of the new book, “Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience, and Finding Joy.”
Source: Ideacast

574: Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant on Resilience

Why effective leaders must manage up, down, and sideways

Why effective leaders must manage up, down, and sideways
Strong team leadership isn’t enough. New research shows the importance—for business impact and career success—of also mobilizing your boss and colleagues.
Strong team leadership isn’t enough. New research shows the importance—for business impact and career success—of also mobilizing your boss and colleagues.
Source: McKinsey

Why effective leaders must manage up, down, and sideways

Artificial intelligence: Implications for China

Artificial intelligence: Implications for China
The country is becoming a hub for global AI development. Five priorities can help China harness AI for productivity growth and prepare for the societal shifts it may unleash.
The country is becoming a hub for global AI development. Five priorities can help China harness AI for productivity growth and prepare for the societal shifts it may unleash.
Source: McKinsey

Artificial intelligence: Implications for China

A road map for digitizing source-to-pay

A road map for digitizing source-to-pay
Technologies available today could automate more than half of the source-to-pay process. The potential? Lower procurement costs, greater savings, and more opportunities to pursue new sources of value.
Technologies available today could automate more than half of the source-to-pay process. The potential? Lower procurement costs, greater savings, and more opportunities to pursue new sources of value.
Source: McKinsey

A road map for digitizing source-to-pay

Forget Millennials. 7 Reasons Why Baby Boomers Are the Ideal Target Market.

Forget Millennials. 7 Reasons Why Baby Boomers Are the Ideal Target Market.
There’s a lot of buzz about millennials today and how to market to them. Marketers often tell you that to appeal to millennials, you need to get on Snapchat and other popular social channels. You need to learn how to create a video that will go viral. You need to make sure you’ve got enough of a balance of the ordinary and extraordinary in the messages you try to deliver. You can’t forget to make…

There’s a lot of buzz about millennials today and how to market to them.

Marketers often tell you that to appeal to millennials, you need to get on Snapchat and other popular social channels.

You need to learn how to create a video that will go viral.

You need to make sure you’ve got enough of a balance of the ordinary and extraordinary in the messages you try to deliver.

You can’t forget to make remarks about making a real difference in the world.

While we, as marketers, can do all this and more, it can get exhausting!

Why are we crafting the majority of our messages to millennials when there are 74.9 million baby boomers out there who want to buy our products too?

We do this because the number of millennials has surpassed the number of baby boomers. There are 75.4 million millennials today (millennials are defined as those between the ages of 18 and 34). But the difference between millennials and baby boomers is small.

Marketing to millennials can feel crazed. It means high-energy, quickly-consumable, frenzied marketing because they have a “fear of missing out,” also known as FOMO.

Baby boomers, born between 1946 and 1964, also have a need to be informed, but they’re a little more patient about it.

It’s true that no company can focus on just one generation. You have to have a strategy appealing to everyone on some level, and that’s why targeting is so important.

Whenever I work with a company to define its customer, I focus on understanding its target market and then segmenting it.

Often, what I find is that a single product or service can be marketed to each of the three generational segments:

  1. Baby boomers – born between 1946-1964
  2. Generation X – born between 1965-1980
  3. Millennials – born between 1981-2000

The generation that often gets overlooked is that first one—baby boomers!

When it comes to the 50+ demographic, only 10% of marketing budgets are used to reach this generation.

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Why is this the case? Why such low marketing expenditure on a generation which, as I’m about to show you, could be incredibly lucrative?

Some marketers think the boomer generation is boring. They’re not sexy. They’re aging. They’re set in their ways. They’re not tech-savvy. Why even bother?

This is a huge mistake! Boomers can be sexy; they’re not as old as you think; they’re not that set in their ways; and they’re incredibly tech savvy.

Why bother? Because the baby-boom generation is probably the hottest age-defined marketing segment you can tap into.

Baby boomers have money

Millennials may have surpassed boomers in numbers, but more than 70% of the disposable income in the US comes from baby boomers.

And here’s the thing. They actually spend it!

How much do they spend?

Try 3.2 trillion every year.

Yes. Trillion. With a “t.”

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And that’s just the US.

If you want to know who will go through with that credit card purchase online, you should probably bet on baby boomers.

Let’s face it. Most millennials don’t have a lot of money.

Look at the generational breakdown. Who has the biggest net worth? And who has the biggest total income?

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Answers: Boomers, and boomers.

It’s great to get millennials energized and excited, but at the end of the day, they don’t have the collective power to turn that energy into money for you.

Baby boomers are on social media, big time

A big misconception about baby boomers is that they are old and traditional so they don’t use social media.

In fact, half of people aged 50 to 64 are on social media, likely on more traditional and well-established platforms such as Facebook.

The bottom line is you don’t have to do all your marketing on Periscope or Snapchat.

The largest audience to date on social media is on Facebook. You’ll get your baby boomers there more than anywhere else.

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But what do these boomers do on social media?

I think this is fascinating. They’re watching! One social technographic survey found that baby boomers were primarily “spectators.”

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In other words, your grandpa might not be the one starting the Reddit flamewar, but he is reading his Facebook news feed.

Let’s take this a step further.

This means baby boomers comprise the largest potential viewership of Facebook advertising!

You can target your Facebook ads demographically. When you do so, why not widen the age group to include baby boomers too?

Look at this survey of baby boomer activity on social media:

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Social media marketing is all about engagement. The data shows us that baby boomers are an incredibly likely source of such engagement.

Baby boomers are making purchases to improve their lifestyles

You have to remember that baby boomers created suburbia as we know it. They bought homes. They left the urban decay of the cities. They began living in comfortable communities.

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One Forbes marketing writer put it this way:

[Baby boomers] want to be out on their own, in a more luxurious place… They are actively looking for newly constructed homes where they can continue to pursue an active lifestyle surrounded by the latest amenities.

Everyone wants to have fun, right? Millennials, Generation Xers—all of us are eager to have a good time.

But baby boomers, more than any other generation, have both the time and money to spend on comfort, amenities, entertainment, and recreation.

Appeal to these aspirations, and you’ll be speaking to them in a way that resonates with them.

Boomers buy products and services for others, not just themselves

Boomers love to invest in educational products and services, especially for their grandchildren (ahem, the millennials).

If you can market your products in this way, you’ll grab their attention.

They value education, loyalty, and authenticity, and any kind of content or product that fulfills that goal will be of interest to them.

I’ve worked with companies that make apps designed to help parents monitor the health and well-being of small children. (Think baby monitors and associated apps.)

When we dug into the marketing, we discovered that a large percentage of their buyers were in the baby-boom generation!

Further research showed that many baby boomers had taken on the role of primary caregivers of their grandchildren.

As young parents pursued their careers, these grandparents used their retirement to provide care to their grandchildren.

And that’s why your parent-focused product or schoolchild-aged toy might benefit from some baby-boomer-targeted advertising!

Boomers are active online shoppers

Boomers are interested in saving money. Besides shopping, they are doing other things online that make life easier. Investment bankers are trying to convert them with the help of this online investing advice, which is an interesting prospect.

With so many of us trying to convince our audiences to invest in our brands, appealing to baby boomers could be a win-win.

Boomers are very tech savvy

Boomers may have grown up buying everything at a department store and using fax machines, but today, they aren’t afraid of online shopping.

In fact, “66% of people over 50 in the United States routinely make purchases from online retailers.”

And email? They’re all in.

Not only that, but they’re likely to click through and check out the promotion you’re emailing them about!

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According to eMarketer, “the majority of baby boomers now own smartphones.”

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They’re not using their smartphones as a glorified land line. They’re shopping, researching, and purchasing!

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If you’re not marketing to baby boomers on mobile devices, you’re missing out on easy money for your business.

Boomers respond to hipster advertising styles

Some have called boomers the “new hipsters.” They’re the Woodstock generation that grew up and became responsible.

They purchase hipster clothing. They respond to hipster advertising.

They even live in hipster neighborhoods!

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Today, loyalty and a sense of well-being are important to them when choosing companies to give their money to, but you can awaken their nostalgia with a good throwback photo every now and then.

Conclusion

Baby boomers as a whole tend to be hard-working people prone to spending money and learning new things.

They want to be informed about the going-ons of the world, and they want to interact with their brands in a personal way. They want you to help them when they are troubleshooting, and they count on you to deliver on a good product when you say you will.

They’re also willing to wait for your messages and communication much longer than millennials.

They won’t tolerate you ignoring them, but they don’t expect you to constantly entertain them.

Knowing these key characteristics about baby boomers is power in your marketing hands because you can tweak your message to appeal to this large group of people.

Don’t fall into the trap of appealing only to millennials with every message.

Baby boomers make up a population that nearly equals the millennials, and they are more active on social media and mobile applications than ever.

Take a long, hard look at your product or service.

Would a baby boomer be interested?

Don’t underestimate this generation. There are very few products or services a baby boomer wouldn’t be interested in, as we saw above.

The least you can do is try. Tweak your messaging; try some new ad targeting; and see what happens!

Do you have a product or service that would appeal to baby boomers?


Source: quicksprout

Forget Millennials. 7 Reasons Why Baby Boomers Are the Ideal Target Market.

My supply chain is better than yours—or is it?

My supply chain is better than yours—or is it?
More-detailed benchmarks show that supply chains can still yield significant value—building on the investments so many CPG companies have already made.
More-detailed benchmarks show that supply chains can still yield significant value—building on the investments so many CPG companies have already made.
Source: McKinsey

My supply chain is better than yours—or is it?

Four keys to successful digital transformations in healthcare

Four keys to successful digital transformations in healthcare
By taking a comprehensive approach to digitization, healthcare companies can deliver products and services more quickly, boost innovation in the industry, and hold down costs.
By taking a comprehensive approach to digitization, healthcare companies can deliver products and services more quickly, boost innovation in the industry, and hold down costs.
Source: McKinsey

Four keys to successful digital transformations in healthcare

Beet and Brett Saison

Beet and Brett Saison
Brew a variety weird things, sometimes get weird results. While my first accidentally-double-sulfited attempt at a LODO Pilsner was meh, the other half of the wort (recipe) fermented with Bootleg Biology’s Mad Fermentationist Saison Blend was a terribly sulfry, eggy, farty mess. The Brulosophy LODO experiment ran into similar (less severe) sulfur issues even with the correct dosage of metabisulfite. What’s happening?Most of the aromatic sulfur compounds in beer are relatively volatile. Yeast are required…
Brew a variety weird things, sometimes get weird results. While my first accidentally-double-sulfited attempt at a LODO Pilsner was meh, the other half of the wort (recipe) fermented with Bootleg Biology’s Mad Fermentationist Saison Blend was a terribly sulfry, eggy, farty mess. The Brulosophy LODO experiment ran into similar (less severe) sulfur issues even with the correct dosage of metabisulfite. What’s happening?

Shredded beets ready to go into the saison.Most of the aromatic sulfur compounds in beer are relatively volatile. Yeast are required to convert the other common fermentation off-flavors, like diacetyl and acetaldehyde, into relatively flavorless compounds. Sulfur aromatics can be carried out of the beer by CO2, either from the yeast or artificially by force-carbonating and degassing. Another approach is to precipitate the sulfur as copper sulfate. I’ve visited breweries that recirculate through a short length of copper pipe to accomplish this.

All beers contain sulfate (SO4) thanks to contributions from the water and malt. Sulfate doesn’t taste like sulfur, although it can contribute a mineral off-flavor in excess. While some (especially lager) strains produce above-threshold sulfur aromatics normally, usually these blow off on their own unless fermentation is abnormally cold, pressurized, or weak. When you add bisulfite (HSO3) in the form of sodium metabisulfite (SMB) as an oxygen scavenger it releases free sulfur dioxide (SO2) most of which oxidizes into sulfate. What happens to the remainder? Well  at least some of it ends up as foul hydrogen sulfide (H2S). So in LODO Brewing, the SMB dosage has to be reduced if you are taste sulfur in the finished beer. Relevant research for wine making.

This is just a few minutes after adding the beets, instant color!Rather than turning to copper, or intentional oxidation, I decided to add three shredded beets (14 oz) to secondary. My theory was that beets’ sugar would cause the yeast to scrub the sulfur while their earthy flavor complimented the yeast hiding whatever sulfur remained. By sheer luck it worked! Not to say it is a perfect beer, but it is drinkable and the sulfur was gone after a few months… Not exactly a solution built for a commercial brewery with a sulfury lager. I could have added fruit to accomplish the same goal, but berry saisons usually fall flat without acidity or sweetness behind the aromatics.

I shared a growler of the beer with Todd Boera from Fonta Flora last week while he was brewing a collaboration at Right Proper. He gave some positive feedback (no sulfur, nice beet expression). I had loosely based my amounts and technique on the recipe for his Beets, Rhymes, and Life in Stan’s fascinating Brewing Local. I also got to share my Juniper Kviek with Marika and Aaron from Scratch Brewing, she said that it reminded her of their Sahti (not a big surprise given we cribbed the Eastern Red Cedar additions from that recipe in their Homebrewer’s Almanac).

The local NPR affiliate stopped by that day for a story on the collaboration and changes to the DC beer scene: Take Time to Smell the Beer

Beets by Drie

The finished beet saison!Smell – Earthy, loamy, beety. Still fresh, maybe a hint of cherry and spice from the Brett. The beet flavor isn’t overpowering, this is just a mild saison given the low gravity, 100% Pilsner malt, and lack of natural conditioning.

Appearance – Shocking magenta with a slight haze. Todd mentioned that they really see the color of beets dissipate in the bottle, but not in the keg. No idea what causes it though (pH? Fermentation? Doesn’t seem to be oxidation). Head has just a hint of pink for the short time it stays around.

Taste – Mildly spicy yeast, fresh earthy beets in the finish. Minimal sweetness, pretty dry, clearly whatever leached from the shredded beets was fermentable. A hint of bitterness, but no other hop character. Just a touch of sulfur, thankfully!

Mouthfeel – Light and thin. Medium-plus carbonation. Not far from seltzer.

Drinkability & Notes – Bright, weird, and refreshing. A bit single note with the beets, but it is a remarkable improvement from the train wreck it was!

Changes for Next Time – Less SMB. A maltier saison would support the beets better. I’d like to taste it with a little citrus zest and/or ginger as well… so that’s what I did!

With the keg half empty I shredded 70 g of ginger into a French press, steeping it with a cup of boiling water for an hour. It’s a technique I used in the blog’s infancy to make Ginger Beer. I added half of this intense tea to the keg along with the zest of one blood orange.

Ginger-Citrus-ified Beets by Drie

Smell – Assertive spicy fresh ginger layered onto the earthiness. Reminds me of a Reed’s Ginger Beer rather than Ommegang Hennepin (which has a touch of ginger). Citrus is in a supporting role.

Appearance – Nearly identical magenta, maybe a hair hazier. Head retention isn’t improved.

Taste – Ginger and citrus are there in the flavor as well, but they leave more room for the beet. The earthiness is mellower. Yeast character is the odd one out. Surprisingly brings out the sulfur a bit more in the finish, not objectionable though.

Mouthfeel – The ginger adds a tickle of heat at the end, but otherwise the same light quenching body.

Drinkability & Notes – A more crowd-pleasing beer, less of a study on vegetable beer – the topic of my most recently submitted BYO Advanced Brewing article (subscribe). The potent ginger makes me think cocktail more than beer. Less interesting, but more drinkable and food-friendly.

Changes for Next Time – Less ginger, or a bolder base beer. Interested to see if it calms down in a week or two.


Source: The Mad Fermentationist

Beet and Brett Saison

5 Popular Blog Post Topics That Everyone Loves to Share

5 Popular Blog Post Topics That Everyone Loves to Share
If you’re a content marketer of any type, you know how crucial it is for your blog posts to make a splash. If you were to look over my shoulder any day of the week, you’d see me checking my social sharing metrics. Just this morning, I logged in to Buzzsumo to take a look at these numbers: (This image shows the social sharing metrics for QuickSprout.com over the past year. These are the four…

If you’re a content marketer of any type, you know how crucial it is for your blog posts to make a splash.

If you were to look over my shoulder any day of the week, you’d see me checking my social sharing metrics.

Just this morning, I logged in to Buzzsumo to take a look at these numbers:

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(This image shows the social sharing metrics for QuickSprout.com over the past year. These are the four pieces of content that received the most social shares.)

Why?

Because social sharing matters!

This isn’t some sort of narcissistic kick. This is a data-driven way to see who’s sharing my content, how many shares I’m getting, what platform those shares are on, and why the articles are being shared.

Obviously, it doesn’t matter how much content you’re putting out if nobody’s reading it.

If nobody’s reading it, nobody’s sharing it.

Ultimately, your content must be shared if you want to increase site traffic.

Many marketers spend their days looking at Google Analytics. I do this too. But Google Analytics is only part of the picture.

There’s a fascinating story behind every social share you receive.

If you’re one of the millions of soloprenuers, entrepreneurs, content marketers, growth hackers, or startup marketers in the US struggling to put out engaging content, you’re not alone.

I get it more than anyone.

The web moves fast; trends come and go; and sometimes it’s hard to keep up.

You’ll be happy to learn, however, that there are a few tried-and-true content categories that everyone (your audience, my audience) loves to engage with and share.

In this post, I’m giving you a few of those content categories and diving into ways to discover more for a lasting result.

By the end of this post, you’ll understand why the content you’re sharing may not be getting the same results as other some content does.

You’ll also understand how all this affects share rate and what you can do to turn your situation around.

Here are your new go-to blog post topics. Read each thoroughly, and think about how they can be leveraged on your blog.

1. Productivity hacking

Time is one thing we’ll never have more of—for now, at least.

If I told you I could make your days longer and you’d be able to finish more work, make more calls, etc., you’d be interested, right?

Of course, you would. Time is important.

It makes sense then that we’re attracted to content focused on gaining more time.

In your upcoming blog posts, incorporate interesting productivity tips, whether showing how your product or service increases productivity or sharing which productivity tips and tricks are working for you.

If you’re familiar with Michael Hyatt’s blog, you’ve probably seen this work. Michael Hyatt is a leadership development expert, but he publishes a lot of productivity-related titles.

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In fact, when I look back on his blog’s social sharing metrics over the past 12 months, two of his top five are on productivity:

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This isn’t an accident. Hyatt knows that productivity topics get shared.

People love sharing practical content that they can vouch for and others can use.

2. Travel

The travel industry is booming for a reason. We love to travel.

Travel is invigorating, relaxing, and educational, and it’s one of the reasons why content focused on travel is so widely shared.

It’s time for you to join the club. Start thinking about what you would want to read.

Depending on the season, you can write about physical locations your audience might search for, say, Jamaica.

If you’re a company that has this information on Jamaica on your blog, take advantage of that. Take control so your blog becomes a frequent destination.

What kind of blogs would benefit from travel-related articles? It might not be that hard to find a connection.

Take ToDoIst for example. They sell a productivity app.

But they blog about travel:

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Even a camera maker such as GoPro can get away with publishing some interesting and super shareable travel articles:

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Evernote knows that travel is a shareable topic, and its blog features plenty of travel articles:

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Give travel a try, fitting it in however you see appropriate, and you’ll likely get some social sharing among an interested audience.

3. Fitness

Face it, there are mobs of people out there (myself included) who would love to just wake up with six-pack abs. That’s why there’s always something new to help get you there.

As long as science continues to discover new things, there will be new breakthroughs to talk about—perfect fodder for shareable blog posts!

Blog posts about fitness have historically been one of the most shared genres of content on the web.

Buzzsumo, the social sharing giant, reported this about 2015 content popularity:

Who doesn’t want to get healthier? Health was a popular topic in 2015. Interestingly, three of the most shared posts on BuzzFeed this year were about health, as seen below.

They explain that the viral element of these articles was the topic of the content: health, diet and fitness tips.

Buzzfeed knows a thing or two about shareable content, and they were the clear leader in the socially-shared fitness topics.

A quick search for “buzzfeed fitness” produces over 800,000 results:

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There are tons of shares on each one of these.

Depending on your industry, blogging about fitness can work well.

Begin this process by searching Google for the top fitness blogs, and scour them to find out what the fitness industry is talking about. Write a post from this, relate it to your business, and that’s it. Simple.

4. Getting what you want in life

The ability to change outcomes quickly and effectively is a skill mankind has been working on for centuries. Want to increase the share count of your blog posts?

Empower your readers.

Show them how to use confidence to get what they want in their lives, relationships, and careers.

Take advantage of this by writing content that talks about specific topics such as:

  • How to get a raise/promotion
  • Negotiation techniques
  • Relationship tips
  • Interview tactics

If spun correctly, these topics will not only be practical and interesting to your readers (i.e., perfect for sharing) but also useful to you: they will introduce you as a thought leader, helping you establish trust with your audience.

And trust, in turn, can produce social sharing.

Some of the major blogs, such as Forbes, Inc., Huffington Post, Fast Co., and Business Insider, are full of articles like this one:

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Feeling that sense of empowerment drives people to share, share, share…

The great thing about topics like these is they can be used on most types of blogs.

5. Money

The fifth and arguably most successful blog topic is money and finances.

The Internet is chock full of people looking to improve their finances, get out of debt, plan for the future, etc.

James Clear, for example, typically writes about health and productivity, but he knows that money topics will hit a social sharing streak. Take this super-popular article he wrote for Business Insider:

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It’s garnered 58K+ shares since it was published!

This is a great topic to blog about, and it’s excellent for highlighting the potential financial benefits your product or service provides. It’s a no-brainer.

But what if you run out of ideas?

What happens when we’ve exhausted these topics next month and we’re back to square one—out of ideas?

At this point, get online and check out forums related to your interests to find out what people are asking and what discussions are viral or trending.

Use the main categories above as a guide (fitness, finance, travel, etc.), and dive into these sub categories on each forum on a more micro level.

For example, let’s say you see on Forum A that “puppies” is trending, and, in particular, many people are talking about “German Shepherd puppies.”

Narrow the focus of your next blog post to include this specific information on German Shepherd puppies, and watch your content take off.

But it’s not always this easy, right? What about when you’re having a rough day writing? Here’s a bonus tip.

In addition to the above, keep what I like to call an “ideas file” handy.

Start with a Google spreadsheet. Every time you come across an interesting idea for your blog, write it down.

Scour the Internet for news, and read other blogs you respect.

These ideas become inspiration for posts down the road. Maintain this file, and I promise you can make your blog more successful.

Conclusion

There are dozens of factors that influence the shareability of your blog posts.

Issues such as the time of posting, time of sharing, style of the title, featured image, author’s authority, keyword presence, etc. are all crucial.

But there’s one thing at the heart of it all: what’s the topic?

If you miss the right topics, the entire blog will be a waste of time and effort.

Not all these topics will work for every blog. I understand that.

Knowing your audience and their interests is your path to ultra-shareability.

Just a few small tweaks to your blog can dramatically improve the rate of sharing of your content.

Spend time researching competitors, writing down your ideas for later use, and keeping your finger on the pulse of the blogs and forums for your topic of interest.

One piece of advice I always leave my clients with is this: Would YOU want to read your blog if you were the customer?

If the answer is no, consider some of the strategies above and let me know how it goes.

Which blog topics work best for you?


Source: quicksprout

5 Popular Blog Post Topics That Everyone Loves to Share